Pupil Premium

The financial Year runs from April to April so this report has been broken down into the previous academic year (September 19-July 20) and its approximate costs and the current academic year (September 20 – July 21) and its approximate costs.

Pupil Premium Report September 2019– July 2020

Pupil Premium is allocated to schools on the basis of any pupil who has had a free school meal entitlement at any point during the previous 6 years. These children are logged as ‘disadvantaged’. The school received from April 2019-April 2020 £1320 per pupil.

The school also received PP funding for children who are ‘looked after’ or ‘previously looked after’ (£2300) or for children who have family members in the armed forces (£300).

Between September 2019 and July 2020:

16 pupils became eligible for one of the above types of Pupil Premium.

Two of these payments started in April 2020.

Therefore the total allocation for 2019 – 2020 was approximately £20, 200. This has been put as approximate as Pupil Premium money goes from April to April; this means the school would not receive funding until April of the school year where children had started the previous September.

The school receives Pupil Premium funding in termly instalments; this is in addition to the main school budget and must be used to close the gap between the academic achievements of these disadvantaged pupils in relation to their peers.

The school may also use these funds to address any other barriers to learning for those and other pupils, such as subsidising school trips and support with Breakfast and After School Club fees so that their parents can afford to return to work and have their children cared for.

Expenditure –September 2019 to July 2020

Covid 19 and the full lockdown of the country means that formal testing did not happen in July 2020. Up until this point, the funding was used for:

£810.00

£1100.00

£300.00

£8900.00

£600.00

£900

£7260

£350

Total= 20,220

Impact of funding 2019/20 on pupil achievement for children in EYFS, KS1 and KS2

Due to Covid 19 and the subsequent lock down which followed, all testing was dropped nationally. There is therefore, no data to share.

Up until March 2020, the children considered disadvantaged and who were entitled to Pupil Premium were making good progress and were on track to make at least expected progress in Maths, Reading, Writing and Grammar Punctuation and Spelling.

Children accessing Thrive and other support m good progress. They were happy to come to school again prior to and post lockdown. Children formed good relationships with adults in school which has led to less dysregulation at play and in class.

Pupil Premium allocations and planning: September 2020 – 2021

Between September 2020 and July 2021:

16 pupils are currently eligible for the Pupil Premium @ £1345 per pupil. Two of these payments started in April 2020.

The allowance for service children is currently £310.

We will lose the payments for two Pupil Premium allowances from April 2021.

The allocation for children who are under the category of ‘Looked after’ and ‘Previously Looked After children’ is currently £2345. No comment has been made on numbers to prevent identification.

Therefore the total allocation for 2020 – 2021 is approximately £22 485.

This, as stated previously, is an approximate as Pupil Premium money goes from April to April; this means the school would not receive funding until April of the school year where children had started the previous September.

The school receives Pupil Premium funding in termly instalments; this is in addition to the main school budget and must be used to close the gap between the academic achievements of these disadvantaged pupils in relation to their peers.

The school may also use these funds to address any other barriers to learning for those and other pupils, such as subsidising school trips and support with Breakfast and After School Club fees so that their parents can afford to return to work and have their children cared for.

Pupil Premium funding and Barriers to Learning.

SNIP (Special Needs Information Press) Nov. 2018 presents an argument, ‘The pupil premium is not working’, by B. Allen; Professor of Education and Director of Centre for Education and Science at UCL Institute of Education:

Here it is highlighted that although we are reaching some of the children who qualify for free school meals and Pupil premium, we are not reaching all of the lowest income families or other families where children may have barriers to their learning, such as; low income working families, families where a member has mental health issues, families where a member has a disability, families where a member has chronic illness or have suffered a bereavement, families where a member is suffering from an addiction or where a child is a young carer to another family member.

The argument continues that we should be moving towards supporting all children with barriers to learning through High Quality Teaching (HQT) to close the gap with all pupils. Pupil Premium funding could go towards staff training and building resource banks to support HQT.

Therefore, our planned expenditure 2020-2021 for PP money will go towards: